workforce

Are Singapore businesses doing enough for 'vulnerable' older workers?

SINGAPORE (Sept 18): With more than a third of the working-age population in Singapore projected to be above the age of 50 by 2030, businesses here will increasingly need to do more to tap the talent and expertise of their older employees.

Some 88% of business executives say Singapore companies need to invest more in leveraging their older employees to sustain business growth, according to a survey by Prudential.

5 ways fresh grads can succeed in the evolving business landscape: Robert Half

SINGAPORE (July 15): Employers in Singapore are preparing for an influx of fresh university graduates to enter the job market.

About 18,500 Singapore students are expected to graduate in July, of which 6,000 are in IT and engineering and 1,300 in accountancy.

These are based on latest available figures from 2017 and assuming relatively static population growth.

Why universal basic income is a bad idea

SINGAPORE (July 1): Owing to the inadequacy of the social safety net in the US and other developed countries, proposals for a universal basic income (UBI) are gaining in popularity. The gap between the rich and everyone else has expanded significantly in recent years, and many fear that automation and globalisation will widen it further.

Why universal basic income is a bad idea

SINGAPORE (July 1): Owing to the inadequacy of the social safety net in the US and other developed countries, proposals for a universal basic income (UBI) are gaining in popularity. The gap between the rich and everyone else has expanded significantly in recent years, and many fear that automation and globalisation will widen it further.

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Top 10 hiring trends in Singapore for 2018, according to Hays

SINGAPORE (Dec 6): Hays Singapore has published a list of what it foresees to be the top 10 talent trends of 2018, in light of a fast-changing workforce environment and continued economic growth.

In a press release on Tuesday, the recruitment firm says organisations can plan to extract greater value from both people and technology in the year ahead to take advantage of positive conditions in the following ways. 

More Singapore workers worry about skill obsolescence rather than layoffs

SINGAPORE (May 4): Singapore’s workers, known for being highly skilled, are well aware and confident of their market power. So much that the majority of employees may not even think twice about jumping ship given the opportunity, should they be displeased with their current work situation in any way.

Based on recent job placement and trend data in the 2017 Kelly Services and Capita Salary Guide, a majority 74% of workers in Singapore believe their skill sets and experience allow them to compete effectively with other job seekers.

Singapore employers struggling to attract, retain top talent: survey

SINGAPORE (Feb 22): Employers in Singapore are struggling to attract and retain top talent, according to a Willis Towers Watson survey of more than 2,000 companies globally.

Three in four employers here say they are struggling to attract top-performing employees, while 56% reported challenges in retaining these talents.

Tens of thousands of jobs go as China’s biggest banks cut costs

SHANGHAI (Sept 7): China’s four biggest banks reported that staff numbers fell by the most in at least six years in the first half, highlighting the possibility that employment has peaked at the firms that are the world’s biggest providers of banking jobs.

A decline of 1.5% from the end of last year left 1.62 million workers at Agricultural Bank of China, Industrial & Commercial Bank of China, China Construction Bank Corp. and Bank of China, earnings filings showed. Agricultural Bank, the No. 1 bank employer, saw its number of employees slip below half a million.

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