recession

Missiles strike, concerns spike

The US has reignited geopolitical tensions with Iran, even as the trade war with China goes on. While there are signs of a broader global economic recovery, central banks have little room to manoeuvre if growth stalls again.

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Is economic winter coming?

(Nov 18): What could trigger a recession in the US? In the past, a tightening labour market after a period of expansion served as an early warning sign. Workers would become more difficult to find, wages would start climbing, corporate profit margins would tend to shrink and firms would start raising prices. Fearing inflation, the central bank would then raise interest rates, which in turn would depress corporate investment and spur layoffs.

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Briefs

SINGAPORE (Nov 4): “Being obsessed with the movement of some money and people to Singapore — and ignoring the movement of people and money elsewhere to [the US], Canada, Australia, the UK, especially for their professional talents — just misses the point.”Temasek Holdings CEO Ho Ching, on reports of Hong Kong funds fleeing to Singapore.

Singapore manufacturers see dimmer outlook

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Can synchronised stagnation be stopped?

SINGAPORE (Oct 21): The global economic slowdown is turning into a synchronised stagnation, with some major economies growing only weakly and others barely at all — or even contracting slightly. For now at least, fears of an imminent global recession seem premature. But policymakers have little appetite for fundamental reforms and limited room for effective macroeconomic stimulus, and thus seem at a loss for ways to revive growth.

6 reasons why the world economy could slide into first recession since 2009

(Oct 13): The global economy is wobbling and whether it topples over is the big question in financial markets, executive suites and the corridors of power.

Investors cheered Friday as the US struck a partial trade agreement with China and there were even signs the UK may strike a divorce deal with the European Union. But the debate over how close the world is to its first recession since 2009 may soon start swirling again.

Singapore hasn't entered recession yet, minister says

(Oct 3): Singapore’s economy probably hasn’t slid into recession yet, though the government is monitoring conditions closely and will step in with support measures if needed, said Indranee Rajah, minister in the Prime Minister’s Office.

“We’re not new to difficult economic situations, we’re not new to recessions,” Rajah, who is also Singapore’s second minister for finance and for education, said in an interview Thursday with Bloomberg Television’s Juliette Saly. “We don’t think we’ve gone into a recession as yet, but we’re keeping a very close eye on it.”

Singapore says US understands its position on WTO privileges

(Aug 1): Singapore says it has an understanding with the US that the city state doesn’t take advantage of privileges that come with “developing country” status in the World Trade Organization.

In response to a tweet last week from US President Donald Trump accusing countries of abusing that status, and ordering his top trade negotiator to take action, Singapore’s Minister for Trade & Industry Chan Chun Sing said his government had never taken advantage of such benefits.

Cloudy with a chance of recession

SINGAPORE (July 19): Consecutive releases of depressing economic data have dampened sentiment and raised the spectre of Singapore’s falling into a recession. Policymakers and economists have recalculated their growth projections and the results are grim: The economy is forecast to expand as little as zero to 1% this year.

Yet, a downturn should come as no surprise. The protracted, tit-for-tat trade war between the US and China, as well as lingering global economic sluggishness, is bound to take its toll on Singapore’s small, very open and trade-dependent economy.

Singapore's $700 bil stock market looks past recession risk

SINGAPORE (July 19): Investors are sanguine about Singapore’s equity market even as the nation faces the risk of a technical recession, as a positive outlook for dividends and earnings overshadows threats from the US-China trade spat.

Singapore’s trade-reliant economy unexpectedly contracted by 3.4% in the June quarter from previous three months, reflecting sluggish global trade and electronics cycles. Following the data release, the International Monetary Fund on Monday cut Singapore’s 2019 growth forecast to 2% from 2.3%.

Cloudy with a chance of recession

SINGAPORE (July 22): Consecutive releases of depressing economic data have dampened sentiment and raised the spectre of Singapore’s falling into a recession. Policymakers and economists have recalculated their growth projections and the results are grim: The economy is forecast to expand as little as zero to 1% this year.

Yet, a downturn should come as no surprise. The protracted, tit-for-tat trade war between the US and China, as well as lingering global economic sluggishness, is bound to take its toll on Singapore’s small, very open and trade-dependent economy.

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