Donald Trump

The crisis of Anglo-American democracy

NEW YORK (July 26): How did the world’s two most venerable and influential democracies – the United Kingdom and the United States – end up with Donald Trump and Boris Johnson at the helm? Trump is not wrong to call Johnson the “Britain Trump” (sic). Nor is this merely a matter of similar personalities or styles: it is also a reflection of glaring flaws in the political institutions that enabled such men to win power.

Briefs

SINGAPORE (July 22): “Carrying around their cup was a status symbol. They were the first store in New York to offer extra virgin olive oil. Now Amazon has extra virgin olive oil. Everyone has extra virgin olive oil.”Restaurant critic Joshua David Stein, on reports that premium grocer Dean and DeLuca’s is struggling to survive after 42 years in the business.

Trump threatens to impose more tariffs on China

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Trump calls for inquiry into Google's work with China

WASHINGTON (July 16): US President Donald Trump said on Tuesday his administration would investigate whether Alphabet Inc’s Google supports the Chinese government, following accusations that a company official refuted hours later at a Senate hearing.

The president repeated accusations made previously by Peter Thiel, a co-founder of PayPal and venture capitalist, that Google may be infiltrated by Chinese intelligence agents.

“A great and brilliant guy who knows this subject better than anyone! The Trump Administration will take a look!” the president wrote on Twitter.

The US is driving demand for alternatives to its dollar hegemony

SINGAPORE (July 15): The ongoing diplomatic crisis between the US and its longstanding “special” ally, the UK, is not doing the former’s global reputation any favours, especially with its commander-in-chief’s approach towards foreign policy and inveterate inability to refrain from Twitter gunslinging.

US President Donald Trump’s sanctions and protectionist pronouncements are made while secure in the influence of the US. That is in turn powered by the comparative strength of its economy and the “almighty” dollar, which lubricates much of the global financial system.

The US is driving demand for alternatives to its dollar hegemony

SINGAPORE (July 15): The ongoing diplomatic crisis between the US and its longstanding “special” ally, the UK, is not doing the former’s global reputation any favours, especially with its commander-in-chief’s approach towards foreign policy and inveterate inability to refrain from Twitter gunslinging.

US President Donald Trump’s sanctions and protectionist pronouncements are made while secure in the influence of the US. That is in turn powered by the comparative strength of its economy and the “almighty” dollar, which lubricates much of the global financial system.

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Briefs

SINGAPORE (July 15): “Just imagine Churchill allowing this humiliating, servile, sycophantic indulgence of the American president’s ego to go unchallenged.”British opposition Labour Party’s shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry. She was criticising Boris Johnson, widely expected to become the next UK prime minister, for not supporting Kim Darroch, until recently the UK’s ambassador to the US, who had described US President Donald Trump in diplomatic cables as ‘inept’ .

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Currency swap

Seventy-five years after the Bretton Woods agreement was signed, making the US dollar the world’s reserve currency, there is talk of an alternative. The US’ weaponising of its currency may well accelerate the process.

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US' economic blockades not unlike an act of war

(July 8): US President Donald Trump has based his foreign policy on a series of harsh economic blockades, each designed to frighten, coerce and even starve the target country into submitting to US demands. While the practice is less violent than a military attack, and the blockade is through financial means rather than the navy, the consequences are often dire for civilian populations. As such, economic blockades by the US should be scrutinised by the United Nations Security Council under international law and the UN Charter.

Briefs

SINGAPORE (July 8): “Large organisations respond to leadership, not administrative heads and not managers but leaders, and Iacocca was a brilliant leader.”Long-time car industry executive Bob Lutz, describing his mentor Lee Iacocca, who led Ford, then Chrysler. Iacocca died on July 2 aged 94.

Boeing pledges US$100 mil for 737 Max victims’ families

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US' economic blockades not unlike an act of war

SINGAPORE (July 8): US President Donald Trump has based his foreign policy on a series of harsh economic blockades, each designed to frighten, coerce and even starve the target country into submitting to US demands. While the practice is less violent than a military attack, and the blockade is through financial means rather than the navy, the consequences are often dire for civilian populations. As such, economic blockades by the US should be scrutinised by the United Nations Security Council under international law and the UN Charter.

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