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Uncommon Sense

Contributor
Contributor12/20/2019 06:00 AM GMT+08  • 13 min read
Uncommon Sense
To young Rolf Studer, his grandfather’s shipyard by the lake of Lucerne was the most magical place in the world. It was not the quintessentialSwiss tableau of crisp blue sky, glassy lake and surrounding snow-capped mountains that fascinated Studer. In
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SINGAPORE (Dec 20): To young Rolf Studer, his grandfather’s shipyard by the lake of Lucerne was the most magical place in the world. It was not the quintessential.

Swiss tableau of crisp blue sky, glassy lake and surrounding snow-capped mountains that fascinated Studer. Instead, it was a dusty workshop by the lake’s edge from which the faint sound of hammering broke the silence.

“In the old days, my grandfather lived above the workshop in his shipyard. My mother grew up there. I used to visit as a boy and I still remember how the sunlight came in through the dusty windows, the smell of the mahogany and lacquer — 12 layers applied to each boat. It was very atmospheric. I fell in love,” says Studer, leaning forward in his seat.

Watch and learn

Put it into practice

The launch proper takes place that evening and proceeds without fanfare. Studer delivers a welcome address, a cloth is whisked off a concealed display to

Dial it up

For one of the few independent watch brands in Switzerland to organise regional events just to touch base with stakeholders is no small investment, but not for all the resources in the world would Oris have it any other way. “Our independence permeates everything we do, from company ownership to our day-to-day practice. It is a mindset adopted by everyone at Oris. It makes us want to go the extra mile because we do what we want, what we believe in — and we wouldn’t trade that for anything,” says the candid Swiss native.

“Our timepieces are the product of the age of enlightenment,” says the captain of the ship. “They are for the citizen who needs to work for a living and is

But holding their ground during the “champagne times”, as Studer called them, could not have been easy. “We kept going because we’re us,” he affirms.

The transition from a multinational powerhouse like Coca-Cola to an autonomous label such as Oris could not have been plain sailing, but Studer regrets nothing.

Or rather, he is being Oris.

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