NTU jointly launches Dyson's first on-campus engineering studio in Asia for aspiring technopreneurs

NTU jointly launches Dyson's first on-campus engineering studio in Asia for aspiring technopreneurs

By: 
Michelle Zhu
27/08/18, 03:41 pm

SINGAPORE (Aug 27): Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Dyson have jointly launched the Dyson-NTU Studio, an engineering studio that offers a semester-long undergraduate course module to NTU engineering students.  

Known as the Product Development Challenge module, the course will be guided by NTU professors and Dyson engineers, and is due to commence this academic year. It will see up to 20 students enroll each semester.

The Dyson-NTU Studio builds upon an existing Dyson-NTU partnership, which includes local overseas internships for NTU students as well as graduate recruitment opportunities.

It will simulate Dyson’s working environment along with the company’s research & development (R&D) processes, through which students will develop various technology prototypes while testing their viability on the NTU Smart Campus.

In a joint release on Monday, the two partners highlight the upcoming on-campus engineering studio as Dyson’s first in Asia.

The British tech firm has committed to contribute $500,000 to the studio for a period of five years.

Through the studio and the Product Development Challenge module, NTU and Dyson aim to give students a chance to work with industry experts, gain access to advanced prototyping equipment and in the process, and develop technological answers to real-world problems by turning ideas into viable solutions.

They also intend for the studio to serve as a platform for industry and career talks for students and researchers, as well as to host engineering-led competitions and tech exhibitions.

Dyson is also in talks with NTU to provide related internship and career opportunities for the university’s students, and to expand the use of the studio to students of other disciplines, such as business and humanities.

“With close guidance from NTU professors and Dyson engineers, our students will learn the essentials of translational research, and develop their ideas into useful solutions to benefit industry and society. A new batch of technopreneurs may emerge from this joint initiative,” says Louis Phee, dean of NTU’s College of Engineering.

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