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Omicron wave may cut future severity of coronavirus, study shows

Bloomberg
Bloomberg1/18/2022 9:47 PM GMT+08  • 2 min read
Omicron wave may cut future severity of coronavirus, study shows
The study shows that omicron can displace delta
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A strong wave of coronavirus infections driven by the omicron variant could hasten the end of pandemic disruptions as it appears to cause less severe illness and provides protection against the delta variant, South Africa-based researchers said.

A laboratory study that used samples from 23 people infected with the omicron variant in November and December showed that while those who previously caught the delta variant can contract omicron, those who get the omicron strain can’t be infected with delta, the researchers said.

While omicron is significantly more infectious than delta, hospital and mortality data in countries including South Africa -- the first country to experience a wave of omicron infections -- appears to show that it causes less severe disease. The study shows that omicron can displace delta, the researchers led by Alex Sigal of the Africa Health Research Institute said.

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